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Programs

Departmental Programs

The Faculty Development Center collaborates with other departments on campus to provide orientation programs for new faculty, part-time faculty, and TAs, and co-sponsors a series called, Provost’s New Faculty Lunch Series several times a semester on topics of recurrent interest. We organize frequent Seminars and Workshops for faculty on specific teaching topics and other areas of professional development.

Seminars, Lectures, and Book Discussions

FDC sponsors seminars, lectures, and book discussions on topics of interest to all faculty. Watch our front page for announcements and links to register for programs that interest you.

Teaching and Technology

FDC works closely with the Division of Information Technology (DoIT) to help faculty members incorporate technology into their courses, including assisting faculty in creating online or hybrid course sites using the Blackboard course tool. For more information go to the Blackboard Help website, contact Sherri Braxton-Lieber in DoIT, or call the Faculty Development Center (5-3916).

List of Past Programs

2014-15

The Art of Teaching with Discussion (Sept. 4): Do you find that your class discussion often consist of a dialogue with one enthusiastic student? Or at best, a ping-pong conversation with a handful of students? Do you struggle to get students to prepare for a meaningful discussion in the first place? Do you find it difficult to get students to dig deeper into ideas? In this session, three faculty share their strategies for getting students to prepare for discussion and engaging them in ways that deepen and expand their understanding. Panelists include: Rebecca Adelman, Media and Communication Studies; Robin Farabaugh, English; Tim Phin, Ancient Studies

Designing Effective and Engaging Writing Assignments (Sept. 5): Are you frustrated with the quality of students’ output on written assignments? Bored with reading yet another uninspired, perfunctory term paper? Pulling your hair out over the fact that your students failed to address some of the most important elements of the course project in their written report? If you would like to create assignments that students can really sink their teeth into—assignments that not only give you a clear sense of their grasp of the material and their ability to apply key concepts, but will also engage them in a meaningful learning experience, then join us for this workshop. We will go through the process of designing and writing, then considering how to support and assess, a writing assignment. Completing this process should yield an assignment that will be clear and comprehensible to students and will enable you to evaluate their understanding of important course concepts. Please bring an assignment that you’d like to rework or ideas for some concepts/content that you’d like your students to write about.

Provost’s Teaching and Learning Symposium (Sept. 12):  This symposium, part of the Hrabowski Innovation Fund initiative, will bring together UMBC faculty to present and discuss pedagogical innovations on campus and plan for future directions. We will be recognizing innovators and inviting faculty to serve on panels to share approaches that promote student success. Groups that will be presenting include: Hrabowski Innovation Fellows and Awardees, Teacher Scholars, Course Redesign Leaders, iCubed Grant Leaders, Digital Humanities Innovators, Breaking Ground and Civic Engagement Leaders, First Year Seminar Representatives, and Pedagogical Innovation Leaders. In addition, all faculty are welcome to submit proposals for poster presentations.

Scholarship of Teaching and Learning Discussion Group (Sept. 16, Oct. 15, and Nov. 20): Do you sometimes find yourself wondering about how students learn in your class? Have you ever analyzed your students’ assignments/conversations/emails looking for clues about that? Are you interested in finding out whether a change you make in your teaching improves your students’ learning? If so, then join your colleagues for a continuing discussion about all aspects of planning, executing, and disseminating a scholarship of teaching and learning project. The sessions will all include ideas for asking good questions, gathering meaningful evidence, and reporting results, though the emphasis on each of these topics will cycle through the semester. Sessions will also include brief presentations of faculty projects. Participants attending any session will receive a copy of the book, Engaging in the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning: A Guide to the Process and How to Develop a Project from Start to Finish by Bishop-Clark and Dietz-Uhler, Stylus Publishing, 2012.

Book Discussion. Engaging Imagination: Helping Students Become Creative and Reflective Thinkers by Alison James and Stephen D. Brookfield (Sept. 17, 23; Oct. 1, 7): From the publisher: “In Engaging Imagination, two leading educators help college instructors across disciplines engage students in nurturing creativity and innovation for success beyond the classroom. Alison James, an expert in creative arts education, and Stephen D. Brookfield, bestselling author, outline how creative exploration can extend students’ reflective capabilities in a purposeful way, help them understand their own potential and learning more clearly, and imbue students with the freedom to generate and explore new questions. This book:

  • shows why building creative skills pays dividends in the classroom and in students’ professional lives long after graduation;
  • offers research-based, classroom-tested approaches to cultivating creativity and innovation in the college setting;
  • provides practical tools for incorporating “play” into the college curriculum;
  • draws on recent advances in the corporate sector where creative approaches have been adopted to reinvigorate thinking and problem-solving processes; and
  • includes examples from a variety of disciplines and settings.

Virtual Office Hours (Sept. 18): Dr. Tara Carpenter will discuss her successful use of Blackboard Collaborate to host Virtual Office Hours (VOHs) to support the students enrolled in her introductory, high enrollment chemistry courses. The event will be held Thursday, September 18, at noon-1:00 PM in ENG 023. Faculty are encouraged to come and learn how to use Collaborate as a tool to support fully integrated synchronous interactions such as VOHs. This session is co-sponsored by DoIT and FDC.

Writing a Compelling Proposal for the Hrabowski Innovation Fund (Sept. 18): In this workshop, you’ll gain insights into what makes a Hrabowski Innovation Fund proposal compelling to reviewers and begin to outline and draft your own proposal. We’ll share tips for what reviewers are looking for in a proposal, helping you to understand what constitutes an innovative idea to enhance teaching/learning. We’ll also break the proposal down into parts, discussing the purpose of each section of the proposal and the types of language to use to convey your ideas clearly and compellingly. You will have the opportunity to share and get feedback on your ideas, as well as draft an outline for your own proposal. Two selection committee members and FDC staff will facilitate this session.

Teaching to Avoid Plagiarism: How to Promote Good Use of Sources (Sept. 24):  Most faculty will encounter plagiarism at some point in their careers and many believe that it is a growing problem in student work. The University has clear policies and procedures for reporting academic misconduct when it happens, but there are proactive steps we can take to try to prevent plagiarism from occurring in the first place. In this session, we’ll discuss the reasons why students plagiarize, what resources are available on campus to help students learn how to use sources appropriately, and how you can support students to learn to use sources effectively in your discipline. Presented by FDC staff with support from co-facilitators Anissa Sorokin, Writing Center; Joanna Gadsby, Library; Suzanne Braunschweig, GES & Academic Conduct Committee Co-Chair; and Mariann Hawken, Instructional Technology.

A New Faculty Member’s Guide to Research and Funding: Dr. Ralph Pollack, Office of the Vice President for Research (Provost’s Luncheon and New Faculty Seminar Series) (Oct. 9):  As new faculty members you are faced with an enormous number of things to do. You must develop new courses, become proficient at teaching, initiate a research program, take part in departmental and university activities, advise students, learn a new culture, and conduct your personal life, all in an atmosphere that is unfamiliar and with little or no training for such activities. Research is a long-term endeavor compared to some of the other demands on your time and can too easily be delayed and left for later. However, research productivity is a critical part of the tenure decision. How then do you develop a research program in these circumstances? How can research become an integral part of your academic life? How can you get funding for a research program? In this presentation, Dr. Pollack will discuss setting professional goals and planning, the nature of significant research, how to develop a research idea, and how to plan for funding that work. All faculty are welcome.

Managing Time and Getting Things Done (Provost’s Luncheon and New Faculty Seminar Series) (Oct. 16): Do you ever feel as if there are not enough hours in the day? Do you find that your plan for work during the day gets overtaken by routine tasks? Do you have a big project looming that will challenge your time management skills? Tips on how to manage your time effectively, plan projects for completion in the time that you have, and keep your stress levels under control will be presented. All faculty are welcome.

Course Design Workshop (Jan. 14): Are you rethinking a course you’ll be teaching this next year? Or, are you planning a new course soon? Or, are you interested in finding more efficient ways to think about student assignments? Then join this discussion on ways to think about course design to be more efficient and effective in accomplishing the goals for your courses. During the session participants will 1) set expectations for student learning, 2) plan assignments and class activities that help students achieve the goals for their learning, and 3) design assessments (exams, projects, papers) that measure students’ achievement of course goals. Participants should bring a course syllabus or ideas for new courses to the session. Lunch will be provided. During lunch participants will hear from a panel of faculty about their experiences using these principles to design hybrid courses.

Teaching College Science (Jan. 22):  How do we help more of our students learn how to learn science? How can we translate the research in cognitive science into effective practices to help students learn to read, write, and problem solve in the discipline? Faculty, post-doctoral fellows, and graduate students are invited to this discussion of the literature and sharing our best practices. We’ll discuss 2-3 short articles on effective ways to teach the processes of science given what the research says about how students learn. Participants are asked to read the short on-line articles before the session. (Links will be sent to registrants).

Active Learning Strategies Series. Part I: Concept Mapping (Feb. 3): Ever wonder what your students’ thinking looks like? Concept maps allow you to have a glimpse into the connections students are making between course content and prior learning. Having students create graphic representations of their knowledge in the form of concept maps can help them to organize and concretize their understanding of course content. It can also provide you with insights into their thinking or allow you to assess their understanding of key concepts. Come to this program to learn more about the research bases underlying concept-mapping, as well as ways to use concept maps to help students meet your learning goals. Joshua Enszer (Chemical, Biochemical, and Environmental Engineering), Steven McAlpine (Interdisciplinary Studies), and Matt Baker (tentative) (Geography and Environmental Systems) will share how they’ve used concept mapping in their courses. Lunch will be provided.

Book Discussion. Specifications Grading: Restoring Rigor, Motivating Students, and Saving Faculty Time, by Linda B. Nilson. (Feb. 11 and 12): From the publisher’s description: Linda Nilson puts forward an innovative but practical and tested approach to grading that can demonstrably raise academic standards, motivate students, tie their achievement of learning outcomes to their course grades, [and] save faculty time and stress…This book features many examples of courses that faculty have adapted to specs grading and lays out the surprisingly simple transition process. It is intended for all members of higher education who teach, whatever the discipline and regardless of rank, as well as those who oversee, train, and advise those who teach. Faculty are invited to participate in either of the two sessions of this book discussion as their schedule allows. Both sessions will discuss the entire book. All participants will receive a copy of the book ahead of time.

Scholarship of Teaching and Learning Discussion Group (Feb. 17, Mar. 11, and Apr. 13): Do you sometimes find yourself wondering how students learn in your class? Have you ever analyzed your students’ assignments/conversations/emails looking for clues about that? Are you interested in finding out whether a change you make in your teaching improves your students’ learning? If so, then join your colleagues for a continuing discussion about all aspects of planning, executing, and disseminating a scholarship of teaching and learning project. The sessions will all include ideas for asking good questions, gathering meaningful evidence, and reporting results, though the emphasis on each of these topics will cycle through the semester. Sessions will also include brief presentations of faculty projects. Participants attending any session will receive a copy of the book, Engaging in the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning: A Guide to the Process and How to Develop a Project from Start to Finish by Bishop-Clark and Dietz-Uhler, Stylus Publishing, 2012.

Book Discussion. Minds Online: Teaching Effectively with Technology, by Michelle D. Miller. (Feb. 26 and Mar. 5): From the publisher’s description: Drawing on the latest findings from neuroscience and cognitive psychology, Michelle Miller explores how attention, memory, and higher thought processes such as critical thinking and analytical reasoning can be enhanced through technology-aided approaches. The techniques she describes promote retention of course material through frequent low‐stakes testing and practice, and help prevent counterproductive cramming by encouraging better spacing of study. Online activities also help students become more adept with cognitive aids, such as analogies, that allow them to apply learning across situations and disciplines. Miller guides instructors through the process of creating a syllabus for a cognitively optimized, fully online course. She presents innovative ideas for how to use multimedia effectively, how to take advantage of learners’ existing knowledge, and how to motivate students to do their best work and complete the course. The session on February 26th will encompass chapters 1-5, and the discussion on March 5 will primarily focus on chapters 6-9. Faculty attending either session will receive a copy of the book in advance. Sponsored jointly by DoIT and FDC.

Providing Audio-Feedback on Student Work (Mar. 2): Have you struggled with giving students timely, helpful feedback on their work without spending inordinate amounts of time doing so? Speaking your mind, rather than writing it may be the answer! Faculty in several departments across campus have been experimenting with new technologies that facilitate giving students feedback in short audio-recordings. Join us for a lively panel discussion in which Sally Shivnan (English) and Karen Whitworth (Biology) will share their experiences with iAnnotate markup and document sharing software and Jing screencasting software to facilitate giving audio-feedback on student papers. We’ll also discuss best practices for providing students effective feedback while making optimal use of your time.

Game-Based, and Gamified, Learning: Engaging Interest, Motivating Minds (Apr. 14): Well-designed games serve a stealthy mission of drawing players into deep conceptual engagement, problem solving, and skill acquisition through interactive and progressively more challenging experiences with content. When applied to college courses, games can stimulate interest and make learning not only more enjoyable, but more profound and long-lasting. Come to this program to find out more about how and why game-based learning works and to hear from faculty at UMBC who are experimenting with games or a game-like approach in their courses. Joshua Enszer (Chemical, Biochemical and Environmental Engineering) and Anne Rubin (History) will share their experiences from their classes.

Motivating Students Workshop: Creating “I Don’t Want to Miss a Moment of This!” Learning Environments, by Dr. Christy Price (Apr. 16): Are there courses and professors who inspire students to attend and engage? The answer is YES! Obviously there are some influences beyond the professor’s control, but research in educational psychology suggests there are things professors can do to increase students’ willingness to attend class, their ability to maintain interest, and their desire to learn. During this presentation we will briefly review the literature regarding student motivation and share the findings of Dr. Price’s own research on this topic. Throughout the presentation, participants will be encouraged to reflect on their methods and the learning environments they create. Digitized video clips of student interviews will be utilized in order to convey practical steps we can take to increase student motivation, interest, and desire to learn in the courses we teach. Christy Price is a nationally recognized authority on innovative teaching techniques to engage millennial learners and was chosen by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching as the Outstanding U.S. Professor for 2012 in the Baccalaureate Colleges category. Dr. Price also won the 2010 Carnegie Foundation Outstanding Professor Award for the state of Georgia. Her dynamic and interactive style make Dr. Price a favorite as a professor and presenter. She regularly presents as a keynote speaker and has led faculty development workshops and retreats at over seventy institutions across the United States and abroad. As a recipient of an institutional foundation grant award, Dr. Price has studied teaching techniques that influence student motivation. Her most recent research focuses on engaging Millennial learners and preventing incivility in the classroom. She is currently a professor in both the School of Liberal Arts and the School of Health Professions, and the founding director of the Center for Academic Excellence at Dalton State College.

Writing a Compelling Proposal for the Hrabowski Innovation Fund (May 13): In this presentation, you’ll gain insights into what makes a Hrabowski Innovation Fund proposal compelling to reviewers. We’ll share tips for what reviewers are looking for and help you to understand what constitutes an innovative idea to enhance teaching/learning. We’ll also break the proposal down into parts, discussing the purpose of each section of the proposal and the types of language to use to convey your ideas clearly and persuasively. You will have the opportunity to share and get feedback on your ideas and, if time permits, draft an outline for your own proposal. Attendance at this presentation is highly recommended for faculty and staff who plan to submit an HIF proposal.

2013-14

Problem-Based Learning (Jul. 25): Facilitated by Dr. Mark Serva, University of Delaware, Department of Management and Information Systems, with Dr. Deborah Allen, University of Delaware, Department of Biological Sciences. Problem-based learning (PBL) is a pedagogical approach in which students engage complex, challenging problems and collaboratively work toward their resolution. PBL is about students connecting disciplinary knowledge to real-world problems, an extremely effective way to motivate learning. This hands-on workshop will introduce PBL concepts and methods. Attendees will learn the components of an effective PBL problem by first tackling a PBL problem and then applying these ideas in writing their own problem. During the working lunch, attendees will discuss how TBL, PBL, and flipping the classroom complement each other and can be combined to create a powerful environment for student learning. The afternoon will dedicate time for problem-writing, as well as for examining the problems that others have written. The workshop leader is Dr. Mark Serva from the University of Delaware Department of Management and Information Systems. Mark is a member of the board of leaders for the University of Delaware’s Institute for Transforming Undergraduate Education and its former associate director. He has conducted dozens of workshops both nationally and internationally and has received a number of teaching awards.

Getting Students to Read, and Learn from, Disciplinary Texts (Provost’s Luncheon and New Faculty Seminar Series) (Sept. 12): One of the most surprising (and frustrating) aspects of teaching is how seldom students seem to do the reading. But the challenge is often deeper than just motivating students to read—we also need to help them learn the skills to do so effectively. Academic writing is so different from the kind of reading that students do, that its mere complexity can act as a deterrent to students’ reading. This discussion, facilitated by the Faculty Development Center and the Learning Resources Center, will focus on strategies both to motivate students to read and help them learn from their reading.

Flipping the Classroom (Sept. 13):  Do you wish that your students would prepare for class? Would you like to feel that the time you spend teaching was more productive in helping student learn to think in the discipline? Then join this conversation about rethinking the traditional teaching approach. Typically our students get their first exposure to content through our lectures. When a class is flipped, students are held accountable for preparing for class in advance (through watching video or reading or doing problems), and class time is spent in students processing ideas and getting feedback from us and their peers. Four faculty will share their experiences with this approach. Panelists include: Sarah Leupen, Biological Sciences; Eileen O’Brien, Psychology; Timothy Phin, Ancient Studies; Anne Spence, Mechanical Engineering.

Great Teachers Talk about Teaching (Provost’s Luncheon and New Faculty Seminar Series) (Sept. 18): Join your colleagues for an engaging discussion on teaching, including ideas on: helping students achieve our goals for their learning, dealing with various challenges in teaching we all face, and keeping our teaching fresh and exciting over time. A panel of senior faculty at UMBC, all teaching award winners, share their insights gleaned from many years of practice and reflection on teaching. All faculty are welcome. Panelists include: Marie desJardins, Computer Science and Electrical Engineering; James Grubb, History; Manil Suri, Mathematics and Statistics.

Scholarship of Teaching and Learning Discussion Group, (Sept. 19, Oct. 18, and Nov. 15): Join your colleagues for a continuing discussion about all aspects of planning, executing, and disseminating a scholarship of teaching and learning project. Participants may attend any and all sessions. The sessions will all include ideas for asking good questions, gathering meaningful evidence, and reporting results, though the emphasis on each of these topics will cycle through the semester. Sessions will also include brief presentations of faculty projects. Participants attending any session will receive a copy of the book, Engaging in the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning: A Guide to the Process and How to Develop a Project from Start to Finish by Bishop-Clark and Dietz-Uhler, Stylus Publishing, 2012.

Teaching Writing in the Digital Age (Sept. 23): Ana Oscoz (Modern Languages, Linguistics, and Intercultural Communications) and Donald Snyder (Media and Communication Studies) present ways that they have used digital formats to help students develop as writers. Co-sponsored by the FDC and the Writing Board.

A New Faculty Member’s Guide to Research and Funding — Dr. Ralph Pollack, Office of the Vice President for Research (Provost’s Luncheon and New Faculty Seminar Series) (Oct. 3):  As new faculty members you are faced with an enormous number of things to do. You must develop new courses, become proficient at teaching, initiate a research program, take part in departmental and university activities, advise students, learn a new culture, and conduct your personal life, all in an atmosphere that is unfamiliar and with little or no training for such activities. Research is a long term endeavor compared to some of the other demands on your time and can too easily be delayed and left for later. However, research productivity is a critical part of the tenure decision. How then do you develop a research program in these circumstances? How can research become an integral part of your academic life? How can you get funding for a research program? In this presentation, Dr. Pollack will discuss setting professional goals and planning, the nature of significant research, how to develop a research idea, and how to plan for funding that work. All faculty are welcome.

Book Discussion. Creating Self-Regulated Learners: Strategies to Strengthen Students’ Self-Awareness and Learning Skills by Linda Nilson(Oct. 8 and 15): From the publisher: “Linda Nilson … presents an array of tested activities and assignments through which students can progressively reflect on, monitor and improve their learning skills; describes how they can be integrated with different course components and on various schedules; and elucidates how to intentionally and seamlessly incorporate them into course design to effectively meet disciplinary and student development objectives. Recognizing that most faculty are unfamiliar with these strategies, she also recommends how to prepare for introducing them into the classroom and adding more as instructors become more confident using them. The book concludes with descriptions of courses from different fields to offer models and ideas for implementation.” All faculty are invited to join a discussion with their colleagues, facilitated by the staff at the Faculty Development Center. The first session will deal primarily with ideas found in the first half of the book. The second session will deal primarily with ideas in the second half of the book. All participants will receive a copy of the book ahead of time.

Managing Time and Getting Things Done, Beth Wells, Assistant Vice Provost for Academic Affairs (Provost’s Luncheon and New Faculty Seminar Series) (Oct. 9): Do you ever feel as if there are not enough hours in the day? Do you find that your plan for work during the day gets overtaken by routine tasks? Do you have a big project looming that will challenge your time management skills? Beth Wells, a Board Certified Coach, presents tips on how to manage your time effectively, plan projects for completion in the time that you have, and keep your stress levels under control. All faculty are welcome.

Turning Difficult Dialogues into Teachable Moments (Oct. 10): When students voice uninformed biases, make inappropriate comments about others’ ethnicities, gender identities, politics, or religion, or express surprising and confrontational opinions, we faculty may feel at a loss in how to respond. These moments may seem to hijack our carefully planned class session, yet these instances can provide wonderful opportunities for learning. How do we facilitate a meaningful discussion that addresses the issue in a way that students can “hear” and learn from? How do we move the class forward in a productive way? Faculty panelists April Householder, Jodi Kelber-Kaye, and Joby Taylor will lead a discussion and workshop on ways to make these disconcerting moments into teachable moments.

Teaching College Science (Jan. 8): How do we help our students learn how to learn science? How can we translate the research in cognitive science into effective practices to help students learn to read, write, and problem solve in the discipline? Faculty, post-doctoral fellows, and graduate students are invited to this discussion of the literature and sharing our best practices. We’ll discuss 2-3 short articles on effective ways to teach the processes of science given what the research says about how students learn. Participants are asked to read the short on-line articles before the session.

Course Design Workshop (Jan. 14): Are you rethinking a course you’ll be teaching this next year? Or are you planning a new course soon? Or are you interested in finding more efficient ways to think about student assignments? Then join this discussion on ways to think about course design to be more efficient and effective in accomplishing the goals for your courses. During the session participants will 1) set expectations for student learning, 2) plan assignments and class activities that help students achieve the goals for their learning, and 3) design assessments (exams, projects, papers) that measure students’ achievement of course goals. Participants should bring a course syllabus or ideas for new courses to the session.

Teaching Large Classes—Effective Practices (Provost’s Lunch and New Faculty Seminar Series) (Feb. 7): Teaching large classes poses special challenges on almost every level: engaging students in class, providing students with support outside of class, and managing the grading load. Join your colleagues for a discussion of favorite practices to address all these issues. Faculty who may be facing these issues for the first time may find this session especially helpful, but all faculty are invited to share their ideas and learn from their colleagues. Please peruse ideas in the Teaching Large Classes Guide of the University of Maryland’s Center for Teaching Excellence as starting points for the discussion: http://www.cte.umd.edu/library/teachingLargeClass/guide/ch3.html

Scholarship of Teaching and Learning Discussion Group (Feb. 4): Join your colleagues for a continuing discussion about all aspects of planning, executing, and disseminating a scholarship of teaching and learning project. Participants may attend any and all sessions. The sessions will all include ideas for asking good questions, gathering meaningful evidence, and reporting results. During sessions we may review papers of published SoTL projects as well as hearing reports from participating faculty on their own projects. Participants attending any session will receive a copy of the new book, Engaging in the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning: A Guide to the Process and How to Develop a Project from Start to Finish by Bishop-Clark and Dietz-Uhler, Stylus Publishing, 2012.

Book Discussion. Using Reflection and Metacognition to Improve Student Learning: Across the Disciplines, Across the Academy, edited by Kaplan, et al. (Feb. 11 and 18): Research shows the importance of helping students learn to think about their thinking (metacognition) in promoting better learning outcomes and improving student engagement with course material. This book offers seven examples across disciplines including STEM, the social sciences, and the humanities. These examples illustrate ways to help students develop their critical thinking abilities, learn more from exams, promote better discussions and improved student writing, and help students learn to think in the discipline. Included are sample syllabi, course materials, and student examples. As the publisher notes: “These models allow faculty to adapt tested interventions that aid learning and have been shown to improve both instructor and student satisfaction and engagement.” All faculty are invited to join a discussion with their colleagues, facilitated by the Faculty Development Center. The first session will deal primarily with ideas found in the first 4 chapters of the book (STEM examples). The second session will deal primarily with ideas in chapters 5-8 of the book (Humanities and Social Sciences examples). All participants will receive a copy of the book ahead of time.

Effective Practices in Group Work: Part 1 STEM Courses (Feb. 25): Research has shown that having students work collaboratively in groups can be a very effective teaching strategy IF we design it carefully. How do we form and facilitate groups so that they work effectively together? How do we get students to buy in to this approach? And, importantly, how do we design group assignments so that student learning is maximized? Five faculty across STEM disciplines share their most effective practices. All faculty are invited to join the discussion. Panelists include: Josh Enszer, Chemical, Biochemical, and Environmental Engineering; Diana Hamilton, Chemistry and Biochemistry; Sarah Leupen, Biological Sciences; Kal Nanes, Mathematics and Statistics; Neil Rothman, Mechanical Engineering.

Beyond the Hype: Responding to and Evaluating Students’ Writing Using New Technologies. Chris Anson, North Carolina State University, University Distinguished Professor and Director, Campus Writing & Speaking Program. (Feb. 26): While responding to students’ writing can be time-consuming, difficult, and even frustrating, it’s also among the most effective ways to help students to develop their writing abilities and engage them more fully in the development and expression of their ideas. But is writing in the margins and at the end of print texts the most efficient and helpful way to provide that response? This presentation will describe and demonstrate some digitally-enabled strategies for responding effectively to student writing, both formatively (during the drafting and revising stages) and summatively (as part of the evaluation process). Participants will find out how emerging technologies such as screencasting, voice recognition, and text expanders are providing new modes and media for response and strengthening what students learn about their writing.

Creating Meaningful Exam Questions with the Help of Bloom’s Taxonomy (Mar. 4): Generating exam questions that really test what we hope students have learned can be challenging. And how can we create questions that not only assess student learning but also promote that learning? One very helpful tool is Bloom’s taxonomy. This hierarchical list of cognitive demands describes learning tasks as ranging from knowledge acquisition through comprehension, application, analysis, synthesis, and evaluation. This gives us a framework to work from as we design exam questions. In this session we will analyze some of our exam questions and, as needed, suggest ways to reframe them to pose the kind of cognitive challenge we want students to address. And we will generate some principles to use as we design new questions. Participants are asked to bring some sample exam questions to work on.

Course Design Workshop (Jun. 5): Are you rethinking a course you’ll be teaching this next year? Or are you planning a new course soon? Or are you interested in finding more efficient ways to think about student assignments? Then join this discussion on ways to think about course design to be more efficient and effective in accomplishing the goals for your courses. During the session participants will: 1) set expectations for student learning, 2) plan assignments and class activities that help students achieve the goals for their learning, and 3) design assessments (exams, projects, papers) that measure students’ achievement of course goals. Participants should bring a course syllabus or ideas for new courses to the session.

2012-13

Great Teachers Talk about Teaching (Provost’s Luncheon and New Faculty Seminar Series) (Sep. 7): Join your colleagues for an engaging discussion on teaching, including ideas on: helping students achieve our goals for their learning, dealing with various challenges in teaching we all face, and keeping our teaching fresh and exciting over time. A panel of senior faculty at UMBC, all teaching award winners, share their insights gleaned from many years of practice and reflection on teaching. All faculty are welcome. Panelists include: Terry Bouton, History; Robert Deluty, Psychology; Cynthia Hody, Political Science; Jeff Leips, Biological Sciences.

Effective Discussions Using Targeted Tech (Sep. 13 and/or 14): Research suggests that discussion is an effective tool for teaching students communication and critical thinking skills, but it also presents some challenges. How do we get more students to participate? How can we teach the content we need to and allow students to find the answers through discussion? How can we get students to a deeper discussion sooner so that we have more time to explore it before class ends? Join us for one or both sessions of exploring discussion and the ways technology may be able to help. Talk Session (Sep. 13): A chance to hear from other faculty about their own experiences with discussion, to find out what research says about effective discussions and to get an overview of some Blackboard tools available to UMBC faculty. All are welcome. Tech Session (Sep. 14): A hands-on workshop on implementing some of these discussion tools with folks from the FDC and DoIT. Registration is limited to 14 participants. Participants are encouraged to attend the “talk” workshop on Thursday.

Scholarship of Teaching and Learning Discussion Group (Sep. 20, Oct. 17, and Nov. 15):  Join your colleagues for a continuing discussion about all aspects of planning, executing, and disseminating a scholarship of teaching and learning project. Participants may attend any and all sessions. The sessions will all include ideas for asking good questions, gathering meaningful evidence, and reporting results, though the emphasis on each of these topics will cycle through the semester. For example, the September meeting will focus a bit more on asking good questions and planning the implementation. Participants attending any session will receive a copy of the new book, Engaging in the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning: A Guide to the Process and How to Develop a Project from Start to Finish by Bishop-Clark and Dietz-Uhler, Stylus Publishing, 2012.

Managing Time and Getting Things Done, Beth Wells, Assistant Vice Provost for Academic Affairs (Provost’s Luncheon and New Faculty Seminar Series) (Sep. 21): Do you ever feel as if there are not enough hours in the day? Do you find that your plan for work during the day gets overtaken by routine tasks? Do you have a big project looming that will challenge your time management skills? Beth Wells, a Board Certified Coach, presents tips on how to manage your time effectively, plan projects for completion in the time that you have, and keep your stress levels under control. All faculty are welcome.

Best Practices in Advising Undergraduates, Ken Baron, Ph.D., Director, Office for Academic and Pre-Professional Advising (Provost’s Luncheon and New Faculty Seminar Series) (Oct. 4): What are key ideas that UMBC faculty need to know when advising undergraduates? How do advisers find information? How do faculty help students think about choices and plan ahead? What are ways to help manage advising load and make advising more satisfying? This session will address these and other essential questions concerning undergraduate advising. All faculty are welcome.

Book Discussion. Teaching Naked: How Moving Technology Out of Your College Classroom Will Improve Student Learning, by Jose Antonio Bowen (Oct. 8 and 15): The publisher describes this new book as: …a new way to think about higher education, learning, and technology that prioritizes the benefits of the human dimension. José Bowen recognizes that technology is profoundly changing education and that if students are going to continue to pay enormous sums for campus classes, colleges will need to provide more than what can be found online and maximize “naked” face-to-face contact with faculty. Here, he illustrates how technology is most powerfully used outside the classroom, and, when used effectively, how it can ensure that students arrive to class more prepared for meaningful interaction with faculty. Bowen offers practical advice for faculty and administrators on how to engage students with new technology while restructuring classes into more active learning environments. All faculty are invited to join a discussion with their colleagues, facilitated by the staff at the Faculty Development Center. The first session will deal primarily with ideas found in the first half of the book. The second session will deal primarily with ideas in the second half of the book. All participants will receive a copy of the book ahead of time.

A New Faculty Member’s Guide to Research and Funding, Dr. Ralph Pollack, Office of the Vice President for Research (Provost’s Luncheon and New Faculty Seminar Series) (Oct 11): As new faculty members you are faced with an enormous number of things to do. You must develop new courses, become proficient at teaching, initiate a research program, take part in departmental and university activities, advise students, learn a new culture, and conduct your personal life, all in an atmosphere that is unfamiliar and with little or no training for such activities. Research is a long term endeavor compared to some of the other demands on your time and can too easily be delayed and left for later. However, research productivity is a critical part of the tenure decision. How then do you develop a research program in these circumstances? How can research become an integral part of your academic life? How can you get funding for a research program? In this presentation, Dr. Pollack will discuss setting professional goals and planning, the nature of significant research, how to develop a research idea, and how to plan for funding that work. All faculty are welcome.

Grading to Communicate: Using Rubrics (Nov. 1 and/or 2): Perhaps no single activity in teaching is more fraught (and more recurrent) than grading. Yet we know that effective grading helps keep students on task and can direct their attention to areas where they need improvement. One useful grading tool is a rubric, and a new rubric tool in Blackboard can make it easy. Join us for one or both sessions. Talk Session (Nov. 1) Join your colleagues to discuss common grading issues, learn what the scholarship says about effective grading and explore ways of using rubrics to make grading more communicative and help students take more responsibility for their own learning. All are welcome. Tech Session (Nov. 2) A hands-on workshop to implement rubrics or get to know grading in Blackboard a little better with the help of folks from the FDC and DoIT. Registration is limited to 14 participants. Participants are encouraged to attend the “talk” workshop on Thursday.

Teaching Writing in Large Enrollment Courses (Nov. 8): Teaching students to write well is a challenge; teaching a lot of students to write well all at once can be even tougher. Come hear panelists Sally Shivnan (English Department, Director of the Writing and Rhetoric Division) and Cynthia Wagner (Biology Department) share their expertise when it comes to helping students commit their ideas to the page. Then join in the conversation! Faculty from all disciplines are encouraged to attend and share ideas, tips, frustrations and successes.

Using Bb to Help Students Take Responsibility for Learning: “Adaptive Release” Tool Promotes Preparation and Interaction (Nov. 27): Do you wish you had a tool to encourage students to prepare for class? Do you wish you had a magic bullet to encourage students to do their work in a timely fashion, and not procrastinate? In many ways, you do. Blackboard has a function called “adaptive release” that lets instructors set pre-conditions (or rules) that students must meet before accessing course content. For example, adaptive release could allow you to require that students take and pass a quiz over your syllabus, online lecture or screencast tutorial BEFORE they can submit an assignment for credit. This panel will focus on how three courses in Economics, Ancient Studies and Public Policy used adaptive release to promote student preparedness and online interaction. Panelists include: Tim Hardy, Economics, Anna Peterson, Ancient Studies, Katie Birger, Health Administration Public Policy (HAPP).

Teaching College Science (Jan. 8 and 15): How do we help our students learn how to learn science? How can we translate the research in cognitive science into effective practices to help students learn to read, write, and problem solve in the discipline? Faculty, post-doctoral fellows, and graduate students are invited to this discussion of the literature and sharing our best practices. We’ll discuss 2-3 short articles each session on effective ways to teach the processes of science given what the research says about how students learn. Participants are asked to read the short on-line articles before each session.

Course Design Workshop (Jan 18): Are you rethinking a course you’ll be teaching this next year? Or, are you planning a new course soon? Or, are you interested in finding more efficient ways to think about student assignments? Then join this discussion on ways to think about course design to be more efficient and effective in accomplishing the goals for your courses. During the session participants will 1) set expectations for student learning, 2) plan assignments and class activities that help students achieve the goals for their learning, and 3) design assessments (exams, projects, papers) that measure students’ achievement of course goals. Participants should bring a course syllabus or ideas for new courses to the session. A panel of faculty will share their experiences using these principles to design hybrid courses.

Making Grading Efficient—Creating and Using Rubrics (Feb. 5): We faculty know what quality student work is when we see it—but our students do not. Sharing our grading criteria with students shows them how we think about disciplinary work and helps them learn how to critique their own work. Using rubrics to grade student work also saves time because it helps students produce better quality work, allows us to grade more quickly and consistently, and provides us with criteria to use in talking to students about their grades. Join your colleagues for this discussion on how to create and use rubrics effectively. Attendees will receive copies of the new edition of Introduction to Rubrics (2nd ed.) by Dannelle Stevens and Antonia Levi, Stylus Publishing, 2012.

Scholarship of Teaching and Learning Discussion Group (Feb. 14, Mar. 6, and April 16): Join your colleagues for a continuing discussion about all aspects of planning, executing, and disseminating a scholarship of teaching and learning project. Participants may attend any and all sessions. The sessions will all include ideas for asking good questions, gathering meaningful evidence, and reporting results. During sessions we may review papers of published SoTl projects as well as hearing reports from participating faculty on their own projects. Participants attending any session will receive a copy of the new book, Engaging in the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning: A Guide to the Process and How to Develop a Project from Start to Finish by Bishop-Clark and Dietz-Uhler, Stylus Publishing, 2012.

Best Practices in Working with International Students in the Classroom (Provost’s Luncheon and New Faculty Seminar Series) (Feb. 15): During this interactive workshop UMBC faculty will learn simple strategies and techniques to help non-native speakers of English to succeed in their courses. Specifically, instructors from the English Language Institute will provide insights into cultural issues affecting student academic success and discuss challenges with students’ listening comprehension and academic writing. Participants are encouraged to email any specific challenges they have experienced with non-native students so that the speakers can address the specific needs of attendees.

Conversation about Classroom Design (Feb 18): Faculty are invited to a conversation with Celso Guitian, Campus Planner, to talk about desired features of classroom design. This session will provide an opportunity for faculty to describe the kinds of spaces that best facilitate the teaching approaches they prefer. This information will help UMBC Facilities Management better understand the teaching and learning needs for spaces on campus. This session also provides an opportunity for faculty to share more about their teaching styles with each other.

Making Grading Efficient—Using Peer Response (Feb. 19): As a faculty member, do you find that you assign less writing than you’d like because you know that you can’t keep up with grading it? Do you find that your students seem to ignore the feedback you do provide, making your commenting seem like a wasted effort? Effective peer response engages students as both writers and readers, enabling an assignment to have a double impact. At the same time, it can lessen your grading burden by asking students to do substantial evaluation. Join your colleagues for a discussion of the best ways to implement peer response in your classes.

Lunch with the Provost (Provost’s Luncheon and New Faculty Seminar Series) (Feb. 25): All new faculty in their first and second years are invited to lunch with the Provost. This session will provide an opportunity to have an informal conversation with the Provost about your work as a faculty member in the context of the University.

Writing Good Multiple Choice Questions (Feb. 28): Multiple choice questions (MCQs) have the advantages of being fast and fair to grade, but we may find them less than ideal for testing students’ higher order thinking. And cognitive science tells us that testing becomes a learning event when students must retrieve information from memory rather than when they just recognize it. So how can we use MCQs to maximize student learning as well as save us time grading? Join colleagues for this discussion of best practices in constructing MCQs. In addition to sharing ideas from our own practice, all participants will be sent the link to two on-line articles that will inform the discussion.

Motivating Students to Prepare for Class—Ideas from the Lilly Conference and Beyond (April 9): Do you feel that your students come to class unprepared and uninterested? Do you find that students seem unable to learn on their own and lack good study skills? Join this discussion in which UMBC faculty and staff share strategies to address these issues gathered from last year’s Lilly Conference on College and University Teaching and their own experience. Panelists include: Cassie Bichy, Learning Resources Center, Sarah Leupen, Department of Biological Sciences, and Eileen O’Brien, Department of Psychology.

Team-Based Learning Practitioner’s Workshop: From Interest to Implementation (May 29): So you’ve heard of the pedagogical approach called Team-based Learning (TBL), and maybe you even attended last year’s workshop on it at UMBC. Now you might be ready to consider how you would redesign one of your courses to use this teaching strategy, but the prospect of a complete redesign is intimidating. Following last year’s Introduction to TBL, this year’s workshop will provide participants with more specific examples of TBL in practice, a lunch Q&A panel with UMBC TBL faculty, and time to design a TBL unit in their own courses.  If you missed last year’s workshop, there will be brief demos to illustrate basics, but ample time to focus on keys to success, including writing good questions and application exercises. Attendees will receive a copy of Team-based Learning: Small Group Learning’s Next Big Step as a further resource. Please read the What is TBL and Twelve Tips handouts before you come, and bring one course unit or module you would be interested in redesigning with TBL.

Course Design Workshop (Jun. 7): Are you rethinking a course you’ll be teaching this next year? Or, are you planning a new course soon? Or, are you interested in finding more efficient ways to think about student assignments? Then join this discussion on ways to think about course design to be more efficient and effective in accomplishing the goals for your courses. During the session participants will 1) set expectations for student learning, 2) plan assignments and class activities that help students achieve the goals for their learning, and 3) design assessments (exams, projects, papers) that measure students’ achievement of course goals. Participants should bring a course syllabus or ideas for new courses to the session. Lunch will be provided. During lunch participants will hear from a panel of faculty about their experiences using these principles to design hybrid courses.

2011-12

High Impact Teaching (Aug. 24): Various research studies show that certain kinds of teaching experiences seem to have the greatest impact on students’ learning. These practices include: first-year seminars, writing-intensive courses, collaborative assignments and projects, undergraduate research, service learning or community-based learning, internships, and capstone courses and projects. Join us for a panel discussion with UMBC faculty who have taught first year seminars, writing-intensive courses, and capstone courses or who have incorporated service or community-based learning or collaborative learning into their courses. They’ll share their thoughts on the value of this kind of teaching and provide insights on how to plan such courses for your students. Panelists include: Marjoleine Kars, History, Carolyn Tice, Social Work, Joby Taylor, Shriver Center, and Jeff Leips, Biological Sciences.

Engaging the Millennial Learner (Provost’s Luncheon and New Faculty Seminar Series) (Aug. 25): This interactive workshop is facilitated by Christy Price who was named the 2010 Georgia Professor of the Year by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching and the Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE). Dr. Price is Professor of Psychology at Dalton State College and a popular presenter and workshop facilitator. What factors influence student motivation and desire to learn? Obviously, there are some influences beyond the professor’s control, but research in educational psychology suggests that one thing we can do to increase student engagement is to create learning environments that are in some ways linked to, and supportive of, the current student culture. During this participatory session, we will briefly review the literature regarding the culture of the Millennial student and apply the findings of the presenter’s research regarding Millennial student culture. We will specifically discuss the characteristics of Millennials’ ideal learning environments, their preferences regarding assessments, their perceptions regarding the characteristics of the ideal professor, and their ideal institutional practices. Throughout the workshop, participants will engage in activities that will require them to reflect on their own teaching methods and/or institutional practices. Open-ended questionnaires, check-lists, and digitized video clips of student interviews will be utilized in order to facilitate discussion regarding practical steps we can take to meet the needs of Millennial learners.

Great Teachers Talk about Teaching (Provost’s Luncheon and New Faculty Seminar Series) (Sept. 8): Join your colleagues for an engaging discussion on teaching, including ideas on: helping students achieve our goals for their learning, dealing with various challenges in teaching we all face, and keeping our teaching fresh and exciting over time. A panel of senior faculty at UMBC, all current or past Presidential Teaching Professors, share their insights gleaned from many years of practice and reflection on teaching. Panelists include: Lynnda Dahlquist, Psychology, Phil Sokolove, Biological Sciences, Wendy Salkind, Theatre, and Tim Topoleski, Mechanical Engineering.

Motivating Students to Prepare and Engage in Their Own Learning (Sep. 9):Do you feel that your students come to class unprepared and uninterested? Do you find that students seem unable to learn on their own and lack good study skills? Join this discussion facilitated by Linda Hodges, Director of the Faculty Development Center, on strategies to address these issues. Participants are asked to read two short articles in preparation for the discussion—links will be sent to those who register for the discussion.

Using Small Group Work Effectively–Ideas from the Lilly Conference (Sep. 15):In this discussion, a panel of faculty share the insights they gleaned from the Lilly Conference this past June on how to effectively use and manage students working in small groups in classes, large and small. The panel includes: Diane Alonso, Psychology, Lili Cui, Physics, Eileen O’Brien, Psychology, Christelle Viauroux, Economics

Managing Time and Getting Things Done, Beth Wells, Assistant Vice Provost for Academic Affairs (Provost’s Luncheon and New Faculty Seminar Series) (Sep. 29): Do you ever feel as if there are not enough hours in the day? Do you find that your plan for work during the day gets overtaken by routine tasks? Do you have a big project looming that will challenge your time management skills? Beth Wells presents tips on how to manage your time effectively, plan projects for completion in the time that you have, and keep your stress levels under control.

Dealing with Difficult Students: Coping with Class Disruptions and Incivility (Oct. 3):Have you had students become upset and disruptive in class? Have you ever felt that students were exhibiting rude behavior? Did you feel unprepared to cope with the situation or wished you had handled it differently? If so, come join your colleagues for a roundtable discussion about effective strategies for working with difficult, disruptive students. This session is co-sponsored by FDC and the Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs.

A New Faculty Member’s Guide to Research and Funding, Dr. Ralph Pollack, Office of the Vice President for Research (Provost’s Luncheon and New Faculty Seminar Series) (Oct. 6): As new faculty members you are faced with an enormous number of things to do. You must develop new courses, become proficient at teaching, initiate a research program, take part in departmental and university activities, advise students, learn a new culture, and conduct your personal life, all in an atmosphere that is unfamiliar and with little or no training for such activities. Research is a long term endeavor compared to some of the other demands on your time and can too easily be delayed and left for later. However, research productivity is a critical part of the tenure decision. How then do you develop a research program in these circumstances? How can research become an integral part of your academic life? How can you get funding for a research program? In this presentation, Dr. Pollack will discuss setting professional goals and planning, the nature of significant research, how to develop a research idea, and how to plan for funding that work.

Balancing Teaching and Research (Provost’s Luncheon and New Faculty Seminar Series) (Oct. 20): Given all that you have to do as a faculty member, how do you manage it all and still have a life? A panel of senior faculty shares their strategies for successfully balancing the multiple demands that faculty face. A question and answer period will follow the panel presentation. Panelists include: Kevin Eckert, Sociology and Anthropology, Thomas Field, Modern Languages and Linguistics, and Michael Summers, Chemistry.

Book Discussion. Engaging Ideas: The Professor’s Guide to Integrating Writing, Critical Thinking, and Active Learning in the Classroom, Second Edition, by John Bean (Oct 5, 11, 19 and 25): The publisher describes the second edition of this best-seller in this way: “Engaging Ideas, Second Edition is a practical nuts-and-bolts guide for teachers from any discipline who want to design interest-provoking writing and critical thinking activities and incorporate them into their courses in a way that encourages inquiry, exploration, discussion, and debate. This edition features new material dealing with genre and discourse community theory, quantitative/scientific literacy, blended and online learning, and other current issues.” All participants will receive a copy of the book ahead of time.

Teaching in the Digital Age (Nov. 2):Join your colleagues for a discussion on ways to engage students and promote learning through digital assignments. Donald Snyder from Media and Communication Studies and Craig Saper from Language, Literacy, and Culture share ways that they have used digital assignments to help students deepen their understanding by translating ideas into digital forms. The discussion will center on what the assignments accomplish, how to assess them, how students have evaluated them, and how you might adopt similar assignments in your own courses.

Creating Inclusive Classrooms: Supporting LGBTQA Students, Luke Jensen, Director, Office of LGBT Equity, University of Maryland College Park (Nov. 14): Do all of your students feel welcome and included in your classrooms? As a faculty member, you may not be aware that our LGBTQA students at UMBC often feel alienated and uncomfortable. Luke Jensen, Director of the Office of LGBT Equity at UMCP, will lead a conversation to stimulate ideas about how to create even safer and more inclusive classrooms and LGBTQA campus climates. He will provide a brief overview to help us establish a common vocabulary (What does the T stand for and what is the difference between transgender and transsexual?) and to address some of the most commonly asked questions about today’s LGBTQA students (Is it really okay to say queer?). The remainder of the workshop will be devoted to group conversation and discussion.

Book Discussion. Effective Instruction for STEM Disciplines: From Learning Theory to College Teaching, by E. J. Mastascusa, W. J. Snyder, and B. Hoyt. (Jan. 5 and 12): Ever wonder why students have such trouble with concepts that seem so straightforward to you? Or why students don’t retain information from one course to the next? Or why students have such trouble applying concepts to problems? If so, then join your colleagues for a discussion of the book, Effective Instruction for STEM Disciplines: From Learning Theory to College Teaching. We’ll discuss the research the authors share from cognitive science on how learning happens and how the ideas can be applied to make our teaching more effective. Each participant will receive a copy of the book, and books will be available before the end of the fall semester. The sessions will be moderated by Linda Hodges, Director of the Faculty Development Center.

Course Design Workshop (Jan. 20): Are you rethinking a course you’ll be teaching this next year? Or are you planning a new course soon? Or are you interested in finding more efficient ways to think about student assignments? Then join this discussion on ways to think about course design to be more efficient and effective in accomplishing the goals for your courses. During the session participants will 1) set expectations for student learning, 2) plan assignments and class activities that help students achieve the goals for their learning, and 3) design assessments (exams, projects, papers) that measure students’ achievement of course goals. Participants should bring a course syllabus or ideas for new courses to the session. A panel of faculty will share their experiences using these principles to design hybrid courses.

New Ways to Use Technology to Enhance Your Teaching–Ideas from the Lilly Conference and More. (Feb. 9): In this discussion, a panel of faculty share insights, both from the Lilly Conference this past June and from the newest version of Blackboard, on ways that technology can help us engage students and make our teaching more effective and efficient. The panel includes Diane Alonso and Eileen O’Brien from Psychology and Karin Readel, Director of Instructional Technology.

Teaching Students with Physical or Sensory Impairments. (Provost’s Luncheon and New Faculty Seminar Series) (Feb. 16): Have you ever thought how you would teach a laboratory class to a student who can’t see the flame of a burner or read a measurement? Or a communication class to a student who is deaf? Or a field class to a student in a wheelchair? Then join your colleagues for a discussion about meeting the needs of students with physical or sensory impairments. The discussion will be led by faculty member Suzanne Braunschweig and Student Support Services staff Cassie Thompson and Denise Perdue. (Please note that this session does not deal with students with cognitive, psychological, or emotional disabilities. Please look for a future program on these topics.)

Book Discussion. Teaching for Critical Thinking: Tools and Techniques to Help Students Question Their Assumptions, by Stephen Brookfield (Feb. 14 and 21): As faculty we all want our students to think critically, but what does that really mean, and how do we teach students to do it? You are invited to explore these questions through discussion of best-selling author Stephen Brookfield’s newest book, Teaching for Critical Thinking. As the publisher states: “In Teaching for Critical Thinking, Stephen Brookfield builds on his last three decades of experience running workshops and teaching courses on critical thinking to explore how students learn to think this way, and what teachers can do to help students develop this capacity. He outlines a basic protocol of critical thinking as a learning process that focuses on uncovering and checking assumptions, exploring alternative perspectives, and taking informed actions as a result. Written to address the broad range of disciplines, this book fosters a shared understanding of critical thinking and helps various constituencies adapt general principles to specific disciplinary contexts.” All participants will receive a copy of the book ahead of time.

From Classroom Management to Classroom Engagement (Feb. 29): How do we get students to engage in class? How do we help them take more responsibility for their own learning and prepare for class? Join this discussion of ways to organize class time, stimulate discussion, and promote more productive class sessions. The discussion will be facilitated by Dr. Linda Hodges, Director of the Faculty Development Center at UMBC. Short background readings will be provided to motivate discussion.

Teaching in the Digital Age, Part II: Working and Learning with Media in New Ways (Mar. 14): Join your colleagues for a discussion on ways to engage students and promote learning through assignments that complicate and extend students’ understandings of the role technologies—both new and not so new—play in communicative practice. Helen Burgess and Jody Shipka from English share ways that they have used older forms of media to introduce students to digital concepts and practices. The discussion will center on how the assignments invite students to explore the intersection between digital and analog media, how to assess those assignments, how students have evaluated them, and how you might adopt similar assignments in your own courses.

Not Your Mother’s Library—Resources for Research and Teaching (Provost’s Luncheon and New Faculty Seminar Series) (Mar. 15):Are you aware of the multiple resources and services available to you and your students from the Albin O. Kuhn library? For example, did you know that the librarians are subject specialists and can offer valuable suggestions for beginning your research for publications or grants? Or that they can provide research help for your students via Blackboard? Or that they can help you design research projects for your students that encourage them to become independent learners (and not plagiarize)? Join this discussion with faculty Pat McDermott and Carol Fitzpatrick and librarians Simmona Simmons and Gergana Kostova about the rich and varied ways that the library can support your work as both a scholar and a teacher.

Teaching in the Digital Age, Part III: Using Social Media and Collaboration Tools to Promote Student Learning (Apr. 11): Join your colleagues for a discussion on ways to engage students and promote learning through the use of wikis, blogs, and social media. Kate Drabinski from Gender and Women’s Studies and Tim Phin from Ancient Studies share ways that they have used these platforms to introduce students to digital concepts and practices. The discussion will center on how the assignments address their learning goals for students, how they assess those assignments, how students have evaluated them, and how you might adopt similar assignments in your own courses.

The Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL) Discussion Group (May 17): Have you ever found yourself intellectually intrigued by how students learn in your discipline? Or have you been involved in department assessment of student learning activities that have piqued your interest? Or are you already involved in research projects that track student progress and success? If so, then consider joining this discussion on the scholarship of teaching and learning (SoTL). We’ll begin to talk about what it is, how to ask good questions, assess outcomes, and publish our work.

Team-Based Learning Workshop (May 23): Have you begun to think that lecturing alone isn’t producing the kind of learning you want from your students? Have you tried group work with only mixed results? And regardless of how you teach, do you find that students aren’t preparing for class? If so, come explore an exciting solution to these issues, Team-Based Learning (TBL). Using TBL to demonstrate TBL, this workshop will be facilitated by the Faculty Development Center, Division of Information Technology (DoIT) and UMBC faculty who’ve taught with TBL. A copy of the TBL book by Michaelsen, Knight and Fink (2004) will be provided to registered participants.

Course Design Workshop. (Jun. 8): Are you rethinking a course you’ll be teaching this next year? Or are you planning a new course soon? Or are you interested in finding more efficient ways to think about student assignments? Then join this discussion on ways to think about course design to be more efficient and effective in accomplishing the goals for your courses. During the session participants will 1) set expectations for student learning, 2) plan assignments and class activities that help students achieve the goals for their learning, and 3) design assessments (exams, projects, papers) that measure students’ achievement of course goals. Participants should bring a course syllabus or ideas for new courses to the session. A panel of faculty will share their experiences using these principles to design hybrid courses.

2010-11

Book Discussion. How Learning Works: 7 Research-Based Principles for Smart Teaching, by Ambrose, et al (Sept. 22, Oct. 6 and 20, Nov. 3 and 17, Dec. 8 and 15): A series of discussions offered by the Faculty Development Center and open to all faculty. Ever wonder why students have such trouble with concepts that seem so straightforward to you? Or why some students just don’t understand what you’re asking of them, no matter how clear your instructions? Or why students have such trouble putting ideas or skills together? Join us this fall for any or all of a series of discussions on issues of student learning—what causes them and how teachers can effectively address them. The discussions will be moderated by Linda Hodges, Director of the Faculty Development Center. Each participant of any session will receive a copy of the book upon which the discussions will be based, How Learning Works: 7 Research-Based Principles for Smart Teaching by Ambrose, et al, Jossey-Bass, 2010. Books will be available 1-2 weeks before the sessions start.

Building a Winning Research Proposal, Dr. Ralph Pollack (Provost’s Luncheon and New Faculty Seminar Series) (Sep. 17): Presentation and questions and answers with Dr. Ralph Pollack on how to prepare a research proposal.

Learning Resource Center and Student Support Services: Meeting Student Needs (Provost’s Luncheon and New Faculty Seminar Series) (Oct. 8): All UMBC faculty encounter students with special needs, from peer tutoring to disability accommodation. Meet the experts from the Learning Resource Center and Student Support Systems in this session and learn how to refer and support students for success.

OSP Resources to Support Faculty Research, Jocelyn Chasis and Office of Sponsored Programs (Provost’s Luncheon and New Faculty Seminar Series) (Oct. 21): Presentation and a question and answer session with Jocelyn Chasis, Director of the Office of Sponsored Programs, and her staff, on services to support faculty research and the development of a successful research program.

Making Your Place at UMBC: Sound Advice from Junior Faculty (Provost’s Luncheon and New Faculty Seminar Series) (Nov. 12): A panel of junior faculty discuss lessons learned and offer suggestions on adjusting to UMBC’s culture and community.

Teaching College Science (Jan. 6, 13, 20): In this short course for faculty, post-doctoral fellows, and graduate students, we discuss short articles on effective ways to teach science given what the research says about how students learn. During the sessions we will think about ways that students learn science, generate questions about how teaching can promote student learning, and discuss resources to help promote student learning. Participants are asked to read short on-line articles before each session and are encouraged to attend all three sessions if possible.

  • The challenges in teaching and learning science. January 6
  • Teaching to promote learning. January 13
  • Thinking about differences in student learning. January 20

Course Design Workshop (Jan. 12): Are you rethinking a course you’ll be teaching for spring? Or are you planning a new course? Or are you interested in general in streamlining your course planning or finding more efficient ways to think about student assignments? Then join this discussion on ways to think about course design that can be more efficient and effective in accomplishing the goals for your courses. Participants should bring a course syllabus or ideas for new courses to the session.

Creating Effective Library Assignments (Jan. 24): Do you struggle with ways to help your students learn how to do library research? Have you found that assignments such as scavenger hunts just don’t seem to be as effective as you hoped? Please join a panel of your colleagues and library staff for a discussion of effective ways to engage students in the all-important skill of finding resources.

Teaching with Clickers for Deep Learning, Dr. Derek Bruff, noted author of Teaching with Classroom Response Systems: Creating Active Learning Environments (Feb. 9): Classroom response systems (“clickers”) are technologies that enable teachers to rapidly collect and analyze student responses to multiple-choice questions during class. Although clickers can be used to ask students the kinds of multiple-choice questions you might put on a test, other kinds of questions can often promote deeper learning. In this talk, we’ll explore ways to craft clicker questions that help students to engage more meaningfully with course content, including questions designed to address student misconceptions, surface student opinions and experiences, and foster critical thinking skills. We’ll also discuss strategies for leading class discussions using clicker questions that frame and motivate those discussions.

Balancing Research and Teaching (Feb. 9): A panel of senior faculty share their strategies for successfully balancing the multiple demands that faculty face. A question and answer period will follow the panel presentation. All interested faculty are invited to attend. Panelists include:Kevin Eckert, Sociology and Anthropology, Thomas Field, Modern Languages and Linguistics, and Michael Summers, Chemistry.

Overtures, Soliloquies, & Other Performances: Integrating the Arts into the College Classroom, Steven McAlpine, Assistant Director of Interdisciplinary Studies (Provost’s Luncheon and New Faculty Seminar Series) (Feb. 10): Dr. McAlpine will share techniques from his writing intensive class (INDS 330: Ways of Knowing) for engaging student interest and critical thinking through the use of songs, film excerpts and other media, and “performing” quotes from literature and drama that are relevant to course content. Participants will share their own use of art forms outside their academic disciplines and how those art forms enhance their (or their students’) understanding of complex concepts.

The Power of Using Small Group Activities to Promote Student Learning (Mar. 2): A panel of UMBC faculty share the variety of ways that they have used students working in small groups either in or out of class as a way to help students develop deeper understanding. Panelists include: Eric Anderson, Physics, Lili Cui, Physics, Kathleen Hoffman, Mathematics and Statistics, William LaCourse, Chemistry and Biochemistry, and Jeff Leips, Biological Sciences.

Book Discussion. Teaching What You Don’t Know, by Therese Hutton (Mar. 3 and 10): With your specialized graduate and post-graduate training do you feel unprepared when asked to teach the department survey course? Or methods course? Or a course in another subspecialty? Or as a veteran professor, do you have an exciting, yet daunting, chance to teach in brand new area? Or do you struggle to identify with the new generation of students? Whether new instructor or seasoned professor, most of us have been or will be called on to teach outside our particular specialty and/or to students we don’t understand. Whether we view this as a frightening challenge or exciting opportunity, teaching a course not in our comfort zone poses special challenges. It’s also a great opportunity to re-envision our teaching. In this book discussion we’ll candidly talk about strategies to address the problems in teaching in a new area and how rethinking our approach can help us overall in being efficient and effective in our role as teachers. Each registered participant of either session will receive a copy of the book.

Team-Based Learning (April 13): Team-based learning has been described as “group work that really works.” This classroom approach exploits the elements of effective group work in a coherent strategy that promotes students’ self-directed learning. John Fritz from DOIT and Sarah Leupen in the department of Biological Sciences share their insights from using this approach here at UMBC.

Managing Time and Summer Goals, Beth Wells, Assistant Vice Provost for Faculty Affairs (Provost’s Luncheon and New Faculty Seminar Series) (Apr. 14): As you finish up the semester, Beth Wells will cover basic stress and time management skills, and give you tips on how to accomplish your goals over the summer.

Book Discussion. Effective Grading, 2nd edition, by Barbara Walvoord and Virginia Anderson (Jun. 8 and 22): Do you sometimes feel that the time you spend in grading doesn’t pay off in improvement in student learning? Would you like to find ways to make grading more efficient? Do you ever wonder about the relationship between grading and assessment? Please join your colleagues for a discussion of Effective Grading by Walvoord and Anderson. The second edition of this classic in the field provides a wealth of ideas on how to maximize the effectiveness and efficiency of grading and tie it more closely to student learning. The discussion will be facilitated by Linda Hodges, Director of the Faculty Development Center. All participants will receive a copy of the book (available at least a week before the session).