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Other Teaching Discussion Groups

Each semester, the FDC sponsors a book discussion group based on a recently published book on a topic related to teaching and learning. Past books have included:

  • Flipped Learning: A Guide for Higher Education Faculty (Talbert, 2017).
  • Why Students Resist Learning: A Practical Model for Understanding and Helping Students (Tolman & Kremling, 2017).
  • Teaching & Learning STEM: A Practical Guide (Felder and Brent, 2016).
  • Teach Students How to Learn: Strategies You Can Incorporate into Any Course to Improve Student Metacognition, Study Skills, and Motivation (McGuire, 2015).
  • Teaching Undergraduate Science: A Guide to Overcoming Obstacles to Student Learning (Hodges, 2015).
  • Whistling Vivaldi: How Stereotypes Affect Us and What We Can Do (Steele, 2011).
  • Specifications Grading: Restoring Rigor, Motivating Students, and Saving Faculty Time (Nilson, 2015).
  • Engaging Imagination: Helping Students Become Creative and Reflective Thinkers (James & Brookfield, 2014).
  • Using Reflection and Metacognition to Improve Student Learning: Across the Disciplines, Across the Academy (Kaplan et al., 2013).
  • Creating Self-Regulated Learners: Strategies to Strengthen Students’ Self-Awareness and Learning Skills (Nilson, 2013).
  • Introduction to Rubrics, Second Edition, (Stevens & Levi, 2012).
  • Teaching Naked: How Moving Technology Out of Your College Classroom Will Improve Student Learning (Bowen, 2012)
  • Teaching for Critical Thinking: Tools and Techniques to Help Students Question Their Assumptions (Brookfield, 2012)
  • Effective Instruction for STEM Disciplines: From Learning Theory to College Teaching (Mastascusa, Synder, & Hoyt, 2011).
  • Engaging Ideas: The Professor’s Guide to Integrating Writing, Critical Thinking, and Active Learning in the Classroom, 2nd Ed. (Bean, 2011)
  • Effective Grading (Walvoord & Anderson, 2010).
  • Teaching What You Don’t Know (Hutton, 2009).
  • How Learning Works: 7 Research-Based Principles for Smart Teaching (Ambrose, 2010).

Faculty who register to attend the book discussion group receive a copy of the book, compliments of the FDC. Watch our home page for announcements of next semester’s book discussion group.

Several other more or less formal discussion groups meet regularly on the UMBC campus to discuss topics of teaching and learning, including a Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL) Group, Team-Based Learning (TBL) Group, the Biology Teaching Circle, the Modern Languages, Linguistics, and Intercultural Communication (MLLI) Teaching Circle, and the Mathematics and Statistics Teaching Circle. The FDC provides support to these groups as needed. Contact the FDC for further information.